GMB Ep #112: Deferring Taxes Using 1031 Exchanges & Delaware Statutory Trusts with Jamie & Patrick Furlong

 

1031 Exchanges and Delaware statutory trusts are both nifty instruments for financial planning. In today’s episode, we explore more about the deferring taxes using 1031 Exchanges and Delaware statutory trusts with Jamie & Patrick Furlong. Jamie & Patrick specialize in 1031 Exchanges with DST’s and other securitized real estate investments. They exclusively serve clients seeking to acquire replacement properties in a 1031 exchange, navigate the complexities and time restrictions in the ever-changing 1031 environment through their company, Legacy Investment Real Estate.

 

 

Show Notes

[04:05] Story of Jamie & Patrick – Patrick shares their origin story, what they do, and how they do it.

[11:32] Delaware Statutory Trust – Jamie and Patrick explain Delaware statutory trust in detail, sharing compressive real-life examples.

[19:37] Importance of DST – Jamie talks about the significance of Delaware statutory trust and why someone should invest a property into a Delaware statutory trust in the first place.

[33:15] Holding Period – Non-traded real estate investment trusts can bring you a vast misfortune. Jamie discusses the holding time you should consider when contemplating real estate investment trusts.

[37:46] Role of the Manager – Patrick talks about the manager’s role in Delaware statutory trusts.

[46:49] 1031 Exchange Tax Code – Jamie and Patrick talk about the predictable changes in the 1031 Exchange tax code.

 

Information provided today is for educational purposes only, does not constitute as individual investment advice, and should not be relied upon as tax or legal advice.

Please consult the appropriate professional regarding your individual circumstance.

DST 1031 properties are only available to accredited investors (typically defined as having a $1 million net worth excluding primary residence or $200,000 income individually/$300,000 jointly of the last three years; or have an active Series 7, Series 82, or Series 65. Individuals holding a Series 66 do not fall under this definition) and accredited entities only. If you are unsure if you are an accredited investor and/or an accredited entity, please verify with your CPA and Attorney.

There are material risks associated with investing in DST properties and real estate securities including liquidity, tenant vacancies, general market conditions and competition, lack of operating history, interest rate risks, the risk of new supply coming to market and softening rental rates, general risks of owning/operating commercial and multifamily properties, short term leases associated with multi-family properties, financing risks, potential adverse tax consequences, general economic risks, development risks, long hold periods, and potential loss of the entire investment principal.

Securities offered through Concorde Investment Services, LLC (CIS), member FINRA/SIPC. Legacy Investment Real Estate is independent of CIS.

 

Resources

Connect with Jamie and Patrick:

Website: legacyire.com/

Jamie

LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/jamie-furlong-927b9658/

Email: [email protected]

 Patrick

LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/farmranch1031exchangennn/

Email: [email protected]

GMB Ep #88: How Securities Lending Drives Down Investment Costs

 

Securities lending is one of the widely misunderstood concepts in the investment community, and securities lending shows up intermittently in the news for both positive and negative reasons. However, this complex trading pattern driven by short selling can drive down costs for the investors. In today’s episode, Grant dives deep into how securities lending works, the different parties involved in it and their roles, how investors participate in securities lending, and how it impacts the performance and costs of ETFs and mutual funds.

 

 

Show Notes

[02:40] Understanding Securities Lending – How securities lending works, how it relates to investment funds that many people put their money in, and how it generates revenue for brokerage firms.

[07:13] Trading Settlement – The process of trading securities is a bit more complex than it looks from the outside. Grant reviews how trade settlements work and how securities lending comes into play.

[12:50] Short-Squeeze – How unexpected fluctuations in stock price can cause investors to lose money in certain scenarios.

[13:47] Driven by Short Selling – Grant reviews how securities lending transactions between several parties create a complex ecosystem that facilitates short selling and how the demand for securities lending is driven by short selling.

[16:23] Supply and Demand – How brokerage firms can make money through securities lending depending on the demand for shares.

[19:10] Sources of Supply – Grant explains the sources brokerage firms use to get the securities they lend to other parties and how investors can make money by lending securities to brokerage firms in some scenarios.

[21:40] ETFs and Mutual Funds – How ETFs and mutual funds are involved in securities lending as another source of supply and how it benefits investors by reducing expenses.

[27:20] Facilitating Short Selling – A common argument about securities lending is that you may not want your shares to be lent out because you don’t want to facilitate short selling in a company that you own. Grant shares his take on the relevance of this idea.

 

Resources

My Take On Short Selling: www.abovethecanopy.us/my-take-on-short-selling/