Case Study: Retiring With $1,000,000

Case Study: Retiring With $1,000,000

Those of you who know me know that I’m a massive baseball fan.  And when it comes to famous quotes from baseball players, one person comes to mind more than any other: Yogi Berra.

Yogi Berra was a long time catcher for the Yankees and had an incredible hall of fame career.  He was equally known for his head-scratching quotes, which the world has affectionately termed “Yogi-isms.”  Yogi didn’t comment often on financial topics, but he does have one quote that applies nicely to retirement planning:

“A nickel ain’t worth a dime anymore.”

When we think about retirement planning, many people consider $1,000,000 as kind of a “golden threshold.”  They think of a million dollars as the minimum nest egg they’ll need in order to retire comfortably.  But as Yogi pointed out, being a millionaire doesn’t amount to what it used to.

So is it even possible to retire with $1,000,000 these days?

Let’s find out.  In this post we’ll explore a hypothetical couple named John and Jane.  They’ve saved $1,000,000 and want to retire, which is a very common situation for many Americans.

Continue reading

Episode 52: Top Year End Tax Planning Moves with Biden in the White House

Episode #52: Top Year End Tax Planning Moves with Biden in the White House


After weeks of delay caused by legal battles surrounding the election, at this point, all signs point to the fact that Joe Biden will be inaugurated as the President of the United States of America. As we discussed in detail in a previous episode, Joe Biden’s tax plan contains tax reforms that affect taxpayers in numerous ways. In today’s episode, Grant dives into some of the tax planning opportunities you should consider in the coming months.Continue reading

How & Why to Open a Roth IRA For Your Kids

How & Why to Open a Roth IRA For Your Kids

One thing all parents have in common is wanting what’s best for their kids.  We all want to give our kids ample opportunities for success.  We all want to keep them rooted in family values.  And we all want them to have a fair shot at life.

When it comes to money, we typically want to give our kids ample support without spoiling them too much.  Most of us don’t want our kids to win the lottery, though.  We’d much rather our kids build some character through struggle and sweat equity.  Nothing gives young people an appreciation for higher education than working a few arduous, low paying jobs.

From a financial perspective it’s difficult balancing these objectives.  How do I help my kids financially without spoiling them?  How do I teach them fiscal responsibility?  How can I show them the power of long term tax advantaged compounding?

These a few questions our clients at the financial planning firm often ask.  The answer is often the Roth IRA.

This post covers why that’s the case, how you can set one up for your kids, and when & how to contribute to one.

Continue reading

Episode 52: Top Year End Tax Planning Moves with Biden in the White House

Episode #51: Non-Qualified Stock Option Basics


 

Non-qualified stock options are a great way to incentivize and reward employees and the management of publicly traded companies. We dedicated today’s episode to exploring the basics of non-qualified stock options. Throughout the episode, Grant reviews how non-qualified stock options work, tax implications, and a few things to keep in mind if you have been granted some non-qualified stock options. Stay tuned until the end of the episode, where Grant talks about some tax planning opportunities that could help you minimize the amount of tax you have to pay in the long run.

Continue reading

Episode 52: Top Year End Tax Planning Moves with Biden in the White House

Episode #49: How to Make Millions While Paying $0 In Federal Income Tax

A few weeks ago, The New York Times published an article that created controversy around President Trump’s tax returns. One of the most controversial claims of this article was that President Trump paid only $750 in federal income tax in the year that he won the election. In today’s episode, Grant dives into specific sections of the tax code that enabled President Trump to reduce his tax bill and how you can incorporate similar strategies in your tax planning.

Continue reading

How are Incentive Stock Options (ISOs) Taxed?

How Are Incentive Stock Options Taxed?

Incentive stock options are a wonderful benefit to receive.  They’re often granted to executives of publicly traded companies and early stage employees of startups, in an effort to align their interests more closely with shareholders.  They’re also more complicated than their close cousins, non-qualified stock options thanks to certain tax advantages.  The timing of when your shares vest, when you exercise, and when & whether you sell the resulting shares determine how your options are taxed & whether these advantages will apply.  This post will cover the basics of incentive stock options, how they’re taxed, and a few points to consider if you’ve been granted them.

 

The Basics of Incentive Stock Options

Stock options give holders the right to buy or sell a certain security at a certain price for a certain period of time.  You can buy and sell stock options on thousands of publicly traded stocks through a typical brokerage account.  Incentive stock options are the same basic contract, where you’re given the right to buy a certain number of shares of your company for a specific dollar amount.  Here are a few basic terms you’ll need to know.

Strike Price: This is the price at which you have the right to purchase shares.  This is often discounted from the current market price.

Fair Market Value: Fair market value (FMV) reflects the value of a company’s shares at any given time.  This is easy to ascertain for large, publicly traded companies since their equity value is constantly being traded over exchanges.  FMV for a given day is simply the average of the high and low selling prices on a particular trading day.  For privately held businesses, FMV is typically determined by a formal appraisal or business valuation.

Vesting: Vesting is the concept of your options becoming “active”.  Often companies will issue stock options that vest over time.  This incentivizes employees to stick around and continue building the value of the company.  A common vesting schedule might be 25% over four years.  This means that if you’re issued 1,000 options, 250 will be available for you to exercise one year after the grant date.  Another 250 would vest after two years, and so on.  Another common schedule for ISOs is a three year cliff, where none of the options vest for the first three years.  Then when the three year date arrives, 100% vest.

Grant Date: This is the date the company gives you the options initially.  Vesting “clocks” start ticking on the grant date.

Expiration Date: This is the date the options expire.  Note that sometimes expiration is triggered upon resignation or termination of employment.  Usually you’ll have 90 days after leaving to exercise your options, but this isn’t always the case.

Bargain Element: The difference between the fair market value of the shares and your strike price is the bargain element.

Qualifying Disposition: If you sell ISO shares at least two years after the grant date and one year after exercising, it’s considered a qualifying disposition.  This comes with favorable tax advantages.

Disqualifying Disposition: Any sales of ISO shares that are not considered qualifying dispositions are considered disqualifying dispositions.  Disqualifying dispositions are taxed differently.

 

Example:

Let’s say that your employer gave you 1,000 incentive stock options three years ago that just vested.  The strike price (exercise price) is $10, and equity shares of your company currently trade over an exchange at $25.  The bargain element works out to $15 per share: $25 – $10.  Even though shares of your company might cost $25 on the open market, your ISOs give you the right to buy them for $10.  If you exercised your options and hung onto them for one year, you could then sell the shares in a qualifying disposition.  Exercising and immediately selling would be considered a disqualifying disposition.

Continue reading

How Are Non-Qualified Stock Options (NSOs) Taxed?

How Are Non-Qualified Stock Options (NSOs) Taxed?

Non-qualified stock options (NSOs) are a very popular way to compensate employees at publicly traded companies, and a wonderful benefit to receive.  But the tax consequences, and how to handle them, can be confusing.

How you handle an NSO grant should depend on your personal financial situation: your objectives, your tax situation, your cash needs, the rest of your portfolio, etc.  Managing your NSOs thoughtfully can lead to a huge tax savings over time.  Managing them haphazardly can lead to an unwanted (and unneeded) bill to the IRS.

This post will cover how NSOs are taxed, and a few questions you should ask yourself before deciding how to handle them.

Continue reading

Biden's Tax Plan

Reviewing the Biden Tax Plan

With the election in November creeping closer, the campaign season is now in full swing.  And the closer we get, the more details & campaign promises start to emerge from the candidates.

Biden’s tax plan has mostly flown under the radar in the national media thus far, thanks to the global pandemic.  But given that he has at least a 50/50 shot at winning, I thought it made sense to devote a post to what he has in mind if he does win the Presidency.  If elected, we could see some substantial changes to the tax code in the next few years.

Here’s the rundown.

Continue reading

Don't Take Those RMDs This Year!

Don’t Take Those RMDs This Year!

As you may have heard, the CARES Act (aka the Coronavirus stimulus bill) created a holiday for mandatory distributions from retirement accounts in 2020.

So if you’re otherwise required to pull money from your IRA or 401(k) this year, you can skip it – penalty free.  This includes retirement accounts of your own AND those inherited from someone else.  Pretty neat, right?

But remember, the CARES Act wasn’t passed until March.  What if you’ve already taken a distribution?  Can you put it back?

The good news is yes, you can, as long as it’s done by August 31st.  Whereas this wasn’t initially the allowable, updated guidance from the IRS says that those of you who took RMDs in January or February can now replace them.

Read on for the details on how to put back your RMD if you’ve already taken one, and when you might still want to take a distribution if you haven’t already.

Continue reading

A Quick Summary of Coronavirus Related Tax Opportunities

A Quick Summary of Coronavirus Related Tax Opportunities

It’s been quite a year so far.  Wildfires in Australia, an impeachment trial of Donald Trump, the death of Kobe Bryant, and the Coronavirus pandemic.  Oh yeah, and don’t forget that it’s an election year.

Given the roller-coaster year it’s not hard to miss some of the tax planning opportunities that have arisen from the Coronavirus and the resulting stimulus legislation.

To help make sure you don’t leave any planning opportunities on the table, this post will review the top Coronavirus related tax opportunities for individuals.

Continue reading