GMB Ep #106: Business Exit Planning With Scott Snider

 

Many business owners eventually come to the point where they will be moving on from the business they passionately built over the years, and having a good exit strategy will help them navigate this important and intimate event in their journey of entrepreneurship. This week on Grow Money Business, we have a distinguished guest, Scott Snider, the President and the co-owner of the Exit Planning Institute (EPI)Scott is an industry leader, growth expert, and entrepreneur. Throughout the episode, he discusses how he assists company owners in developing substantial businesses while also aligning their own financial objectives and personal purposes. He also explains several vital factors that every business owner should consider when exiting their company. 

 

 

Show Notes

[03:26] Current Role – Scott talks about his current role and how he helps with business exit planning. 

[06:40] Perfect Exit – Scott shares his insights about the perfect exit to a business owner who is about to do so in a few years. 

[10:23] Emotional Hurdles – Scott expresses his thoughts on managing psychology and people’s emotional hurdles along the business exit process. 

[14:12] CEPA – CEPA is an acronym for Certified Exit Planning Advisor. Scott gives a brief explanation for the entire CEPA process. 

[18:54] Exit Strategy for Young Entrepreneurs – Scott leaves a message to all the young business owners out there. 

[20:21] Scott’s Story- Scott emphasizes the significance of not letting your business define you while sharing his story and takeaways from his past experience. 

[29:35] Family Business – Explaining the nature of the family business, Scott shares how he and his father work together in their family business. 

[41:43] Vision – CEPA is suitable for any advisor who wants to learn how to help an owner position their company for a successful and significant exit. Scott broadly talks about the vision of the Exit Planning Institute. 

[47:43] Future Plans – Having explained the concept of the wealth gap, Scott explains the future plans for his business. 

[53:33] Research Findings -Scott shares details about one of his recent researches and exciting factors they discovered through it. 

Resources

Connect With Scott: 

LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/scott-snider-epi/ 

Website: exit-planning-institute.org 

Facebook : facebook.com/exitplanninginstitute/ 

Instagram: instagram.com/exitplanninginstitute/ 

 

 

Mentioned in the Episode:  

Certified Exit Planning Advisor: exit-planning-institute.org/program/certified-exit-planning-advisor/ 

Owner Readiness: exit-planning-institute.org/state-of-owner-readiness/ 

Every Family’s Business by Tom Deans: https://everyfamiliesbusiness.com/book/ 

Traction by Gino Wickman: https://www.audible.com/pd/Traction-Audiobook/B00A9ZO7T6 

Your Business Is An Investment

Your Business is an Investment

Quick anecdote to kick off today’s post.

In a small town in the midwest there are two plumbers: Jim and Jason.  Both are 50 years old, and both are married with two kids who will someday go to college.

Jim and Jason are both great at their trade.  They are available when needed, charge a fair price for stellar work, and are well liked in the community.  They have the exact same number of customers in any given year, and both produce the exact same amount of revenue.

Their interest in building their respective businesses is where they differ.  Not from a revenue or growth standpoint, but from an operational standpoint.  Hiring & training support staff and new plumbers.  Systematizing and building process efficiencies.  Jim is hell bent on streamlining his business in an attempt to organize & simplify his work.  Jason is uninterested – he cares more about the customers and the work, and doesn’t mind when his professional world is hectic.

Now let’s fast forward 15 years.  Jim and Jason have brought in the exact same amount of revenue over the last 15 years.  But Jim has been far more efficient with how that revenue has been distributed.  He has systems, procedures, and operations built out to where his only duty is jumping in the car and driving out to see his customers.  Because of that he’s been free to spend more time with his family, and has packaged his business in a way that’s attractive to buyers.  He could sell to his employees or another party, and reap the value of the enterprise value he’s built.  The funds will contribute to his lifestyle in retirement.

Jason is ready to retire, but hasn’t been able to squirrel enough funds away to stop working.  He’s not been able to delegate much of his work to employees, and has virtually no systems or processes in place.  He realizes that in order for someone else to take over his business they would need to spend time – at least a year – working side by side to understand how he has everything set up.  Jason’s had to work twice as hard to produce the same revenue as Jim.  He’s enjoyed far less time with his family and his health has suffered.

It’s not surprising that a tightly run business creates more value.  What is surprising to many small business owners is the fact that failing to tighten up operations could be the difference between capitalizing on years of hard work by selling versus walking away with nothing.

Which gets us to the point of today’s post: your business is an investment.

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